Get Motivated: 4 Tools for Building a Sober Life

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Maintaining sober may be challenging on a mental and physical level. But you should be aware that quitting your addiction is neither the beginning and the end of the process, and this is true regardless of how long you’ve been clean or how much progress you’ve made thus far. The true objective, which is to construct a sober life that one can enjoy without the use of alcohol or drugs, is a process that takes considerably more time than just refraining from using substances.

The toughest part of recovery isn’t breaking the habit of drinking or using drugs in the short term; it’s staying clean over the long haul. You can accomplish this goal with the appropriate strategy and the correct instruments, despite the fact that it could seem to be an impossible task, particularly if you’ve previously given in to temptation. Here are some of the tools by

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Renaissance Recovery to help you out.

Compile a Set of Self-Help Resources

Motivating yourself may get you started on the path to sobriety, but don’t put all your faith in it. Why? When things become tough, motivation won’t be able to get you through it. Being able to accept the idea that willpower is a finite resource is essential if you want to maintain your sobriety. As an alternative, you should focus on developing routines that will help you stay sober even if your motivation wanes during the course of the day. In spite of this, you should continue to employ motivation to keep you going.

You may begin by putting together a basic to-do list.. List all that was taken away from you by alcohol on half a page. On the other hand, jot down all the benefits you’ll get if you avoid it. Reflect on what’s important to you and what you’d want to accomplish in the future. What can you do to keep yourself from slipping into a coma? It may be helpful to jot down your motives and refer to them later when you’re faced with temptation.

It’s possible to discover sobriety inspiration in the form of a mentor, a quote, or even a book. You may start with well recognized novels like Amy Reed’s Clean, Nikki Sixx’s The Heroin Diaries, Howard Samuels’ Alive Again, Martha and Ken Grimes’ Double Double, and Scott Stevens’ Adding Fire to the Fuel.

Group Help

It’s possible that you believe you’re all alone, yet that’s not the case. Twelve-step programs like AA or NA are well-known, and there are variants for almost every substance. There is a lot to be gained by participating in one of these organizations, and if you haven’t already, you should do so. Addiction affects millions of individuals in the United States, and talking to just one of them might help you come to terms with your own addiction. As a result, you’ll be held to a higher standard of performance since you’ll have to report to someone every week.

Family and Friends

Depending on your position, your family and friends may be more or less helpful, but if you are able, contacting them may be really beneficial. Helping your family understand your addiction so they can support you and work together to keep you clean may be a huge benefit, even if it is not always the best answer. Your family will be able to give support that no one else can. To guarantee that your friends understand your situation and can assist or, at the at least, that they will not encourage you to break your sobriety, you should speak to them.

Planned Approach

Everyone has a plan, and no matter what yours is, you must take the necessary measures to make it practical and feasible. The first stage is to set objectives that are focused on success rather than on the passage of time. Even if you fail once, studies have shown that if you strive towards a large objective, your drive would be lost even after only one failure. Trying to work out every day can seem like a good idea at the first, but if you don’t succeed, you might as well give up altogether. You may avoid this by setting weekly workout objectives that allow you to make up for missed workouts or fit them into a different day without affecting your drive.

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